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Virtual Seminar on Climate Economics - Shared screen
Glenn Rudebusch (SF Fed)
23:56
Type in your questions using this chat feature, and select “raise your hand”, so we can easily unmute you. If you want me to read the question, start question with “Please ask …”. Given the large audience, please be concise.
Richard Tol
39:30
This is one of the results of Anthoff and Tol (2014).
Michael Greenstone
40:01
for question 1, is the exercise that you set the price once and never change it?
Richard Tol
40:07
I was not surprised at that finding, so I doubt it was an original contribution then.
Gilbert Metcalf
41:44
following on Greenstone's question, a way to frame this is how sticky it is to change policy as new ifnromation arises.
Glenn Rudebusch (SF Fed)
42:51
please type your question in as well
Michael Bauer
47:17
Seems like the three main central questions would be best addressed with different types of models. For example, the effects of a non-uniform carbon tax need a regional model like RICE, whereas analyzing the effects of the wrong carbon tax might require a model with uncertainty. Why one grand model for all three separate questions?
Christian Traeger
49:35
Following up further: formal uncertainty analysis essentially asks and answer the same/closely related question by answering "what if the environment turns out better or worse than in a deterministic policy scenario". The literature finds that in most cases uncertainty increases the optimal policy, which is true with and without feedbacks (so with or without updating to arriving information). For some uncertainties (or in the language here for some reasons why policy is too high or too low) it can happen that the effect goes the other way round..
Glenn Rudebusch (SF Fed)
52:26
did you want to ask a question
Christian Traeger
53:19
Note a question, was merely continuing the side-discussion/comments (-;
Glenn Rudebusch (SF Fed)
53:49
Type in your questions using this chat feature, and select “raise your hand”, so we can easily unmute you. If you want me to read the question, start question with “Please ask …”. Given the large audience, please be concise.
Michael Greenstone
55:35
where do the damage functions come from? how are damages valued in rich and poor places?
Michael Greenstone
57:00
there is now pretty strong evidence on non-linearities in damages in a much more pedestrian way than dealing with tipping points. that is, an extra degree at 35 C matters much more than at 20 C
Gilbert Metcalf
01:08:48
A point for Per later: the ability to substitute NG and coal for oil depends on technology adoption in transporation. Without EVs, oil and NG are not very substitutable - at least in developed countries. But if EVs take off, coal and NG (and renewables) can more easily sub for oil.
Michael Greenstone
01:10:12
fwiw, the Climate Impact lab work is finding incredible heterogeneity in responses around the world...…much more nuanced than can be captured in 8 regions. this isn't worth interrupting Per's talk but is more of a FYI
Simon Dietz
01:14:21
I am a little bit surprised that the availability of fossil fuels (coal) doesn't stop temperature reaching 8C, given central estimates of climate sensitivity, or is my intuition going wrong? Question for later.
Frances Moore
01:19:48
If utility is log consumption and there are big differences in income across regions, shouldn't the comparison here be in terms of utility rather than % consumption loss? (i.e. the utility differences would be smaller than the consumption loss).